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COVID-19, South Korean President – Foreign Policy

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Seoul and Washington have pledged they’re ready to talk with a nuclear-testing North Korea—but they’re not getting any response.
The alliance is one of the best bargains in geopolitics.
Ukraine is calling out Russia’s “state nuclear terrorism.”
A three-way agreement signed in Madrid paves the way for alliance expansion—at a cost.
Quiz: What in the World? What in the World?… | View Comments ()
Have feedback? Email whatintheworld@foreignpolicy.com to let me know your thoughts.
1. Belize, Germany, Indonesia, Senegal, and the United States co-hosted a virtual Global COVID-19 Summit this week. How many coronavirus cases have been recorded worldwide since the pandemic began?
60 million
110 million
390 million
520 million
The United States, for its part, passed the grim toll of 1 million COVID-19 deaths this week.
2. Who is South Korea’s new president, who was inaugurated on Tuesday?
Moon Jae-in
Lee Jae-myung
Yoon Suk-yeol
Ban Ki-moon
S. Nathan Park explains the roots of the conservative politician’s victory.
3. U.S. President Joe Biden met with representatives from most members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations this week. Which of the group’s members was missing?
Singapore
Vietnam
Myanmar
Brunei
Myanmar was excluded from the event as its post-coup government drags its feet on dialogue with the opposition.
4. Meanwhile, U.S. first lady Jill Biden met with the first lady of Ukraine over the weekend. What is her name?
Olena Zelenska
Marina Zelenska
Angelika Zelenska
Yulia Zelenska
5. Protests in Sri Lanka prompted the resignation this week of which politician?
Minister of Finance Basil Rajapaksa
Minister of Irrigation Chamal Rajapaksa
President Gotabaya Rajapaksa
Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa
Mahinda Rajapaksa is just one of many powerful Rajapaksas in Sri Lanka. His brothers Basil and Chamal Rajapaksa resigned along with the rest of the presidential cabinet in early April, and their other brother, President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, remains in office. The country’s political crisis has no end in sight, FP’s Michael Kugelman writes in this week’s South Asia Brief.
6. Somalia will elect a new president this weekend. The country’s executive is chosen indirectly by the lower house of Somalia’s Federal Parliament, known as what?
House of the People
Chamber of Deputies
Consultative Assembly
National Council
7. Whom did French President Emmanuel Macron visit Monday on his first international trip since being reelected last month?
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky
Senegalese President Macky Sall
U.S. President Joe Biden
8. North Korea finally acknowledged its COVID-19 outbreak this week, after claiming to have avoided any cases at all for the first two years of the pandemic. It is one of only two countries to refuse to vaccinate its population. What is the other?
Syria
Papua New Guinea
Australia
Eritrea
9. Lebanon holds parliamentary elections on Sunday amid an economic crisis. Around how much has the Lebanese pound depreciated in value since 2019?
15 percent
30 percent
60 percent
90 percent
This election could be crucial to turning things around for Lebanon, but there’s little optimism, FP’s Anchal Vohra writes.
10. Local media in India reported this week that an Indian couple is suing their son—over what supposed transgression?
Refusing to give them a grandchild
Putting them in a retirement home
Marrying a woman they disapprove of
Getting divorced after they paid for a massive wedding
The couple, Sanjeev and Sadhana Prasad, are requesting their son and daughter-in-law pay back more than $600,000 spent on their wedding, honeymoon, education, and home if they fail to produce a child within a year. “At least if we have a grandchild to spend time with, our pain will become bearable,” the Prasads said.
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Nina Goldman is a deputy copy editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @goldmannk
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INTERNATIONAL

US women’s basketball dominates on international stage – KRQE News 13

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by: DOUG FEINBERG, Associated Press
Posted: Oct 1, 2022 / 12:54 PM MDT
Updated: Oct 1, 2022 / 01:04 PM MDT
by: DOUG FEINBERG, Associated Press
Posted: Oct 1, 2022 / 12:54 PM MDT
Updated: Oct 1, 2022 / 01:04 PM MDT
SYDNEY (AP) — A’ja Wilson and Breanna Stewart are keenly aware of the legacy of success they are part of with the U.S. women’s basketball team.
They don’t plan on letting the incredible run end any time soon.
“I don’t think we’re showing signs of stopping, that’s for sure,” Stewart said. “We have a lot of people are entering their prime or are in their prime.”
Wilson and Stewart helped the U.S. to a fourth consecutive World Cup championship Saturday with an 83-61 win over China, setting a record margin for a gold-medal game.
“Everyone knows that when you come here, when you wear USA across your chest the (pressure) that comes with it,” Stewart said. “It’s just embracing that. All the legends before us and what they’ve done, how they’ve won. Each team is different and we need to make our imprint on history.”
This team left its mark on the World Cup as one of the most dominant teams in the Americans’ storied history, winning four straight gold medals and 30 games in a row in the tournament. Next up for this group is the 2024 Olympics in Paris. The Americans will be trying for an eighth consecutive gold medal there.
“This is something that’s special to us. It’s not lost on us what’s been done since 1996. I hear about it all the time,” U.S. coach Cheryl Reeve said. “What I wanted to do is make sure this journey was fun. Because I think there’s some times when you have pressure to win or the perceived pressure, it takes the enjoyment out of it.”
What started with Sue Bird and Diana Taurasi has now been passed down to Wilson and Stewart. With Alyssa Thomas the oldest player at 30, the domination could continue for years to come.
“It’s been an incredible journey just to continue to lay that foundation down like so many of the greats in front of us have,” Wilson said. “Now it’s our turn to step up and be in that situation.”
The U.S. (8-0) finished the World Cup averaging 98.8 points — just short of the mark held by the 1994 team that averaged 99.1. They won by an average of 40.8 points, topping the amount by the 2010 team.
“Maybe around the world they kind of looked at it and said, ‘Hey now’s the time to get the USA,’” Reeve said. “I think what we showed is that our league, the WNBA and professional basketball players in the United States are really, really good.”
As they’ve done all tournament, the Americans did it on both ends of the court, playing stellar defense as well as using a high-powered offense.
The game was a sellout with nearly 16,000 fans — the biggest crowd to attend a women’s World Cup game since the inaugural tournament in 1953 in Chile.
“You can’t say people don’t support women’s basketball,” Stewart said of the crowd. “If you look at all these people in this arena tonight. There was a lot of people cheering for us and against us, but they’re here watching women’s basketball.”
While the U.S. will be the heavy favorite to win the gold in Paris, there are new teams emerging. China won its first medal since the 1994 World Cup, and Canada reached the medal round for the first-time since 1986.
“I think every team will learn from this experience. You gain a lot of knowledge in the World Cup,” Reeve said.
___
More AP women’s basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/womens-basketball and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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New York Liberty, WNBA players populate World Cup rosters – The Associated Press – en Español

SYDNEY (AP) — New York has long been known as a melting pot, a city of diversity.
That moniker also works for the city’s WNBA franchise, the New York Liberty, which has seven players competing in the women’s World Cup for five different countries.
Overall, there are 27 players in Sydney who competed this season in the WNBA, plus a few others like Lauren Jackson, who either played in the past or were drafted but haven’t competed in the league yet.
Before the U.S.-China game, Betnijah Laney and Han Xu exchanged a hug. The two Liberty players are on opposite teams a few weeks after their WNBA season ended with a playoff loss to Chicago in the opening round.
“That’s one of my favorite parts about the New York team, we are so international and we’ve got such great talent from all over the world,” Australian Sami Whitcomb said. “I think that represents our fan base as well. It’s really amazing to come here and still get to see your teammates.”
Laney and Sabrina Ionescu are with the U.S. Han is playing for China. Bec Allen and Whitcomb are with Australia along with New York coach Sandy Brondello and her husband Olaf Lange, who lead the host nation. Draftee Sika Kone is on Mali and fellow draftee Marine Fauthoux plays for France.
“It’s really cool to have teammates here and compete against each other. It’s a great experience for all of us,” Laney said. “It’s definitely something that’s pretty cool to have the diversity and to come together. It does extend to our fan base.”
Whitcomb said that the Liberty players talked about the potential of them all coming to Sydney for the World Cup.
“How fun it would be to have so many of us over here and we were all going to see each other,” she said. “We didn’t know how many people would make the teams, so it’s amazing.”
All the teams are staying in the same hotel near the arena. Whitcomb said the Liberty teammates have been getting coffee with each other in between games.
“It just goes to show we’re very international that’s for sure,” Brondello said. “To get two players on the USA team that’s always hard to break into but I’m proud of those two. They’ve worked so hard to get there and you know the Aussies go without saying but Han is doing a great job as well.”
There’d be an eighth Liberty player in the tournament, but Marine Johannes got hurt right before it began.
New York isn’t the only WNBA team well represented in Sydney: Seattle has five active players as well as Jackson. The Storm’s coach, Noelle Quinn, is an assistant with Canada. The Chicago Sky and Las Vegas Aces have four players each.
The players all also share a common dining room for meals, giving them chances to interact off the court.
“I’m happy to see my teammates playing in the World Cup,” Han said. “Before I only had two teammates but now I have a lot of them on different teams and it’s nice to see them around.”
___
More AP women’s basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/womens-basketball and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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Zelenskyy calls Russia a state sponsor of terrorism; Biden calls on U.N. to stand with Ukraine – CNBC

Zelenskyy calls Russia a state sponsor of terrorism; Biden calls on U.N. to stand with Ukraine  CNBC
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